Torque Converters - Archive

Common Torque Converter Problems

Nov 30, 12 • Torque ConvertersComments Off on Common Torque Converter Problems

Issues With Your Heavy Machinery?

Some Symptoms of Possible Torque Converter Problems

Common Torque Converter Problems

If you’ve been in this field long enough, you’ve likely dealt with a few common torque converter problems. Although we are confident in the excellent capabilities, and reliability, of the torque converters we provide, we also know that problems do occasionally arise. Considering the extreme mechanical feats of your heavy machinery, and the tasks required of the torque converters in those machines, this makes sense. What also makes sense, then, is being prepared.
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Three Things to Know About Hydraulic Torque Converters

Jun 13, 12 • Torque ConvertersComments Off on Three Things to Know About Hydraulic Torque Converters

Here at K&L Clutch & Transmission, we make it our business to supply you with the highest-quality torque converters for industrial machinery, including:

But it’s also our mission to supply information and understanding about our products to better help you choose which hydraulic torque converters best fit your needs.

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Allison Torque Converter Parts and Service Manuals

Here at K&L Clutch & Transmission, we pride ourselves deeply on the unmatched level of clutch and transmission service and maintenance we provide. Our industry-leading technicians and engineers are constantly pioneering new, better ways to improve part repair and replacement turnaround time in order to better help our customers keep their projects up and running.

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Comparing Torque Converters: Single Stage vs. Three Stage

Sep 8, 11 • Torque ConvertersComments Off on Comparing Torque Converters: Single Stage vs. Three Stage

Here at K&L Clutch, we’re proud to offer a comprehensive line of torque converters for a broad variety of industries, from some of America’s leading industrial clutch manufacturers, including:

Twin Disc Torque Converters
Allison Torque Converters
Manitowoc Torque Converters
Clark Torque Converters

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Repair Transmission and Torque Converters and Return to Productivity

Aug 1, 11 • Torque Converters, Torque Fluid, TransmissionComments Off on Repair Transmission and Torque Converters and Return to Productivity

The profit losses start mounting as soon as your transmission fails out in the field. When it happens (and it happens to just about everyone), you need transmission replacement and repair parts, and you need them fast.

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Three Common Torque Converter Problems

Nov 30, 10 • Torque Converters1 Comment
Recognizing Common Torque Converter Problems | K&L Clutch and Transmission

Industrial Torque Converter

Industrial torque converters provide the torque and horsepower that makes your projects go—but they’re not immune to breakdowns.

Take a look at the four common torque converter problems you might run into or check our latest torque converter problems article.

1. Overheating

The most likely problem you’ll run into, overheating can usually be directly traced to low converter fluid pressure and/or air present in the system. This can be caused by several factors: when fluid levels get too low, when the filter gets clogged, suction lines are cracked or the charging pump begins to fail. Overheating can damage the seals, o-rings, and gaskets leading to fluid leaks and a lack of proper fluid circulation.

2. Deformed Blades

Fragmented or deformed turbine blades is another sure way to see an industrial torque converter quickly lose its effectiveness. This can happen as a result of rapid overheating of the torque converter or contamination ingested into the system which can lead to the turbine blades beginning to break and pull away from the hubs. With extreme heat, the blades can even break into pieces. Torque converters with deformed or fragmented blades require significant and expensive repairs (or a complete rebuild) to avoid a prohibitive loss of torque converter efficiency.

3. Proper Installation

When installing a new K&L torque converter, it is best practice to install new cooler lines and have the radiator/cooler professionally cleaned. This ensures that all contamination from the previous converter installation is removed from the system. If coolers and lines are not clean, then debris from the previous converter failure will be ingested into the new converter causing a very quick and costly failure.

From our home office in Hurst, Texas, we supply only the best torque converters from the best brands. But we also stock a full catalog of replacement and repair parts, can manufacture customized specialty parts from our warehouse and can meet you with a service team just about anywhere in the world should you have a problem.

Contact us for more information.

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Top, Tough Torque Converters

Jul 13, 10 • Torque ConvertersComments Off on Top, Tough Torque Converters
Industrial Torque Converter from K&L Clutch and Transmission

Torque Converter

We provide torque converters at K&L Clutch. Lots of them. Converters bursting with horsepower and grit. The best converters available anywhere in America. The kind you need—sometimes immediately—to get the work done, and the kind that won’t leave your valuable equipment investments vulnerable in the field.

In fact, as your torque converter provider, here’s our goal for you:

  • Lower Maintenance Costs
  • Increased Fuel Economy
  • Increased Engine and Equipment Life
  • Shock Protection from Load and Equipment Damage
  • Smooth Operation at Optimum Efficiency Speed Ranges
  • Less Downtime

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Hydraulic Torque Converters Explained

Oct 30, 09 • Torque ConvertersComments Off on Hydraulic Torque Converters Explained

Hydraulic Torque Converters | K&L Clutch and TransmissionAt K&L Clutch, we supply only the highest quality torque converters. But to understand what this means, let’s start with the basics:

Torque converters are, of course, an automatic transmission’s answer to a manual transmission’s clutch—with one big advantageous twist (which we’ll get to below). Torque converters allow the engine to turn while a machine’s wheels and transmission gears come to a complete stop (think cars idling in a driveway).

More specifically, a hydraulic torque converter is a fluid coupling that lets an engine spin independently of a transmission.

To understand why this matters, think of a car in traffic. Keeping the car stopped at a stoplight takes just a light push on the brake, because there is only a tiny amount of torque being passed through the torque converter from the slowly turning engine or motor. But when you step on the gas, the engine roars and more torque is passed to the wheels. It’s basically a transfer of rotation power from any sort of internal combustion engine or electric motor to the driven object or load.

But here’s the twist — hydraulic torque converters can actually multiply torque when there is enough of a difference between the rotational speeds of the engine and load, basically serving the same function as a reduction gear.

Hydraulic torque converters can be broken down into three basic parts:

Impeller — The impeller (or the pump) is basically a ring of metal blades that are driven by the engine shaft, flinging fluid about in a manner similar to a washing machine, thereby imparting kinetic energy. The spinning also creates a vacuum, drawing even more fluid into the center.

Turbine — The turbine is a set of three rings of blades connected to the shaft. The fluid from the impeller enters and turns the turbine and causes the transmission to spin, powering the machine.

Stator — Located in the fluid circuit between rings of turbine blades, the stator (or reaction member) is made from two non-rotating sets of blades, contained in a stationary housing. The original fluid exits the turbine, moving in a different direction than when it came in (and in an opposite direction of the engine and pump spin). The stator keeps the fluid from hitting the pump, which would slow the engine.

Benefits:

· Longer Engine Life

· Longer Equipment Life

· More Efficient Fuel Economy

· Smoother Operation

· Better Shock Protection

· More Reliable Automatic Braking

· Faster Work Cycles

Hydraulic torque converters also have specific benefits that depend on your type of use.

For example, with slush pumps, hydraulic torque converters permit operation through a wide range of volume vs. pressure while using the maximum size liner. Crawler tractors can operate with maximum drawbar pull at all times, even in the roughest of operating conditions. Hoists and winches can hold loads in mid-air with the throttle alone, without bobbing. Shunting locomotives benefit from a good tractive effort curve. And in excavators, hydraulic torque converters deliver two to three times the amount of torque for hoist and crowd loads.

Check out our complete line of torque converters, or contact us for more information. We’ll tell you everything you need to know.

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